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Focusing on the words on your site. New Zealand. Making people stop at your site.

Why would your customer go elsewhere?

With online, only the window has changed 

We still look into the shop windows and then make the decision either to enter or to move on. The landing page of your website is your most important web page.  

Today around 70% of all purchases start with a browse on the Internet, and some time down the line that will either lead to a click on the “Buy Now” button or a visit to a shop or business with the view to purchase. 
 

All businesses can have a shop window

Where the shop window was the realm of those that had street fronts and sold services to passers-by, now those that would merely hang a sign above the door, the accountant or lawyer, IT Company or graphic design studio, in fact anyone who runs a business (and is concerned about not missing out on 70% of the market), has to stage a successful landing page (often the home page) in order to be successful at attracting customers.

Your landing page is all about “visual” and not all businesses lend themselves to what only the eye can see. It’s worthwhile to employ a branding expert to push your business ahead of your competition.  
 

Without knowing anything about what’s behind the window (or screen) the decision on whether it’s worthwhile to enter is based purely on emotion.


We still make decisions on emotion – your Landing Page has to be convincing

While your shop window may now be a website, the way we make the decision to enter your “shop” has not changed.  Without knowing anything about what’s behind the window (or screen) the decision on whether it’s worthwhile to enter is based purely on emotion. That is why the landing page of your website has to be compelling. It has to make a promise on what is behind the door when you walk into the business or when you click to go further into the website. (Look at my"Heaven and Earth" Blog). The good thing is that there are ways to design it so that the shopper wants to engage.


You still have to make the sale

Ultimately you still have to make the sale. Your landing page gets a potential customers through the door, they now have to be convinced to buy your product or services. But for now, because of your convincing landing page, you’ve made a great start. I’m tempted to say that “the rest is up to you” and in part that's true. However, if your website content is true to its initial promise it can assist with getting that important handshake from a new customer, or with getting that money in the till. Why would your customer look elsewhere?


Uli Knapp
 

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